Every second Saturday of the month, 4 pm - Divine Liturgy in English of Sunday - Ukrainian Catholic Cathedral of the Holy Family, Duke Street, London W1K 5BQ. Followed by refreshments.
Next Liturgy: Saturday 11th November, 4pm

But see below for the Pontifical Divine Liturgy in Westminster Cathedral on 28th October, to mark the 60th Anniversary of the Ukrainian Exarchate & Eparchy in the UK, served by His Beatitude Sviatoslav, Father & Head of the Ukrainian Catholic Church.

To purchase The Divine Liturgy: an Anthology for Worship (in English), order from the Sheptytsky Institute here, or the St Basil's Bookstore here.
To purchase the Divine Praises, the Divine Office of the Byzantine-Slav rite (in English), order from the Eparchy of Parma here.
The new catechism in English, Christ our Pascha, is available from the Eparchy of the Holy Family and the Society. Please email johnchrysostom@btinternet.com for details.

"It's Now or Never: The Return of the Eastern Christians to Iraq and Syria" - John Pontifex of Aid to the Church in Need gives the annual Christopher Morris Lecture in the Society's 90th year. Monday 27th November at the Ukrainian Catholic Cathedral of the Holy Family. 6-15 pm Divine Liturgy, 7-15 pm Lecture, 8-15 pm Reception. £10 donation requested. RSVP to johnchrysostom@btinternet.com







Wednesday, 8 July 2009

Moscow and Constantinople Orthodox Patriarchs meet


Asia News reports, 7 July 2009:

For his first foreign trip since his election Kyrill, Patriarch of Moscow, picked Constantinople. His visit was dominated by a desire among Orthodox to consolidate the spirit of a new journey together, a process which began back in October at the pan-Orthodox meeting in Geneva.

Based on Kyrill’s and Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew’s remarks it is clear that the journey together, mutual respect and a consolidated Orthodox unity are important goals. Both leaders stressed the importance of the pan-Orthodox meeting in October, which laid down the grounds on which Christian Orthodoxy can develop its roadmap for the future.

Their respective address clearly expressed a strong desire to accelerate the ecumenical dialogue, a necessity in today’s world whose challenges only a united Universal Church can meet.

Bartholomew began his homily by stressing the long and important witness of faith of the Russian Church, which survived 70 years of Communist captivity under an atheist regime, to begin its journey anew.

He also noted the personality of the new Patriarch of Moscow, Kyrill, expressing his gladness at his election not only because he is a man of deep religiosity but also because he is a great expert of the Christian world.

“Dear brother! Even though the atheist regime has fallen, the atheist practices of hedonism and religious indifference flourish everywhere with all its consequences,” the Patriarch said.

“Mass murder is committed in God’s name and entire populations are uprooted from their land. There is a disgraceful trade in human beings and an upsurge in nationalism and religious fanaticism. [. . .] Instead of standing united and offering convincing responses to the challenges of a desperately troubled world, we Christians are troubled by intrigue and divisions, scornfully unwilling to be conscious of our responsibility towards Our Pastor Jesus Christ, who wants to see love, peace and unity prevail among us. For only then, shall we be able to set a good example for the nations [of the world] and thus for the Father of Light! [. . .] Indeed our last meeting in Geneva, which took place in an atmosphere of unity, stands as an example and a point of reference, and this not only for Orthodox Christians.”

Kyrill’s homily followed in the same spirit. In it the Patriarch of Moscow stressed the deep historical ties that link the two Churches, noting the gratitude the Russian people towards the Church of Constantinople, the Great Church of Christ.

Into his address the Patriarch turned to the spiritual contribution of the Russian Church. He described how the 70 years of captivity in which it was held helped it understand the importance of freedom and human rights.

“May our painful stories be useful; may they constitute the contribution the Russian Church can make to a world that is losing its way,” Kyrill said.

“With our mind turned to the journey already undertaken we can say that the seed of Salvation that the missionaries of Constantinople sowed has given life to a rich and blessed fruit. This constitutes Christian Orthodoxy’s shared inheritance.”

“Our visit represents a good beginning to renew the fraternal relations between the two Churches on the path towards the One Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church of Christ,” he said.

“From the bottom of our heart we agree with what you told every Orthodox at the pan-Orthodox meeting in October when you urged us to be conscious of our tradition and work for a united Church,” the Patriarch of Moscow said by way of conclusion as he addressed Bartholomew.

In view of the new climate the issue of the Estonian Church appears to be on its way towards a peaceful resolution. Until now it had been a major stumbling block in relations between Moscow and Constantinople.

“The strength of our shared tradition of faith is stronger than any human division,” the Ecumenical Patriarch told the press. Kyrill agreed.

Bartholomew invited Kyrill to take part in next year’s pilgrimage in Cappadocia, cradle of Christianity, a land rich in Christian vestiges.

Some pundits also noted how Kyrill showed what he is made of, not submitting to political pressures, a sign that he is a true man of the Church.

Lastly, Kyrill met Turkish Prime Minister Erdogan and Religious Affairs Secretary Ali Baltakoglu.

Turkish sources reported that during the meeting Erdogan said that the Theological School in Chalki would open soon.

The Communio blog comments:

"Why is this event important? Past tensions and subsequent lack of cooperation between the two Sees have stunted the fruitful proclamation of the Gospel. Unity suffered. Also ... the gesture of the two patriarchs' meeting opens the possibility significant dialogue with the See of Rome.

"The homilies of each patriarch was a stunning example of grace at work. Content could not be out done but the promise of the Halki's school of theology on the part of the Turkish government is impressive. I pray that it comes about."

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